The Work Number Income Verification Service Can Go to Hell

So we are applying for a new apartment in Charlotte before our move from San Francisco in April. We have to provide proof of employment and income to our leasing agent. Makes sense.

I send in my offer letter so they can see my salary/etc.

Then for Ron we have to use The Work Number system which large employers use so the employee can just give the leasing agent (or bank, mortgage people) the information to look up online. I’m guessing that his employer pays millions of dollars a year for this service to be easy and automated for employees and the parties that need access to this information. Then the leasing agent calls and tells me that they have to subscribe to this service and pay for it.

THEY have to pay YOU for the service that RON’S EMPLOYER pays YOU to do.

It gets better: $69 a month (recurring). Then $14 per lookup. That is $83 that you want my leasing agent to pay because evidently you don’t charge Ron’s employer enough money for you to do your job effectively.

I then tried to sign up for the service myself making a fake account just so I could login and see what the leasing agent would see and send them a PDF. Even after entering in a lengthy form with company name (I Hate You, Inc.), Stock Symbol (EXTORT) and Supervisor (Sister Mary Aloysius), I would still have had to verify on the phone that this was a real account.

I’d have to verify on the phone with a real person so I could pay you to then verify on the website with a system. So now I have to wait until Ron gets back home from work (he could be flying for the next six days) so he can fax me his W2.

Outsourcing HR services is supposed to make things easier for everyone. Instead you are taking money from the employer, removing any real person from the process and then trying to charge others even more money because you can’t do your job for the money that the employer pays you.

Go to hell.

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About Andy Wibbels

Andy is an award-winning blogger and author of the book Blogwild! A Guide for Small Business Blogging. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Entrepreneur, Wired, Business Week, Forbes, and other national and international media. He was worked at several San Francisco startups including Get Satisfaction, SAY Media, InMobi, Keas, and Mindjet. Currently, Andy is Director of Marketing at Lucidworks. Tw · Fb · G+ · Li

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