5 Ways to Increase Reading Comprehension

From a discussion about increasing read comprehension:

  • “Read for meaning rather than sound. Reading without vocalizing has a lot in common with listening to someone speak. When someone speaks, you hear the words, but you only hear them in connection with whatever thoughts and ideas the speaker is trying to convey. The same is true of reading without vocalizing: You read words for meaning, not sound. You see the word on the page and respond to its meaning without the intermediary step of hearing the word’s sound. You don’t read the words as words — you read units of meaning (like ideas, thoughts, and descriptions) whose building blocks happen to be words.
  • Try to perceive the words rather than see them. Imagine that each word is a symbol (not a sound) that conveys a meaning.
  • Turn off your ears. Pretend your ears have a volume control and turn it to the mute setting.
  • Widen your field of vision. By taking in more words on a line, you force yourself to read more words at a time, and this helps prevent vocalization.
  • Identify the thought units in sentences, not the words, and read thought unit by thought unit rather than word by word.”

Read many more tips in the discussion: How do I stop internally vocalizing words as I read them to speed up comprehension of text in books?

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About Andy Wibbels

Andy is an award-winning blogger and author of the book Blogwild! A Guide for Small Business Blogging. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Entrepreneur, Wired, Business Week, Forbes, and other national and international media. He was worked at several San Francisco startups including Get Satisfaction, SAY Media, InMobi, Keas, and Mindjet. Currently, Andy is Director of Marketing at Lucidworks. Tw · Fb · G+ · Li

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